Sunday, September 28, 2008

The 'Benedict Effect' begins to inform English Academe: Casey and Pink

It seems that with the Pontificate of Benedict XVI now three years old, the English scholastic establishment considers it worthwhile to come out of the academic woodwork, whereas before Benedict they saw no point in wasting their effort on a lost cause, such was/is the intellectual paucity of those who are in control of the Catholic Church in England and Wales. This is the 'Benedict Effect'. England and Wales are not lost yet.

You've read Casey; now read Dr Thomas Pink (Kings College London) - The Toils of Ecumenism-a new doctrine or an old policy? For Dr Pink's credentials see kcl Philosophy-Staff Verity Harte.

With thanks to Damian Thompson for initial links.

Back later,

In pro Christo pro Papa,

Jane

4 comments:

Confiteor said...

Absolutely brilliant essay by Dr. Pink. It is simply the best elucidation that I have ever read of the hermeneutic of continuity applied to a specific point of contention from Vatican II, in this case, the changed policy (not doctrine!) of ecumenism. This is MUST reading for all Traditionalists who want to avoid the schismatic drift of the SSPX while remaining Traditionalists.

Jane said...

Confiteor: Absoltely, ditto, ditto, ditto. i do hope the others are reading these wonderully encouraging and well argued pieces. And now there's another one by Aiden Nichols OP
on New Liturgical Movement will post about it over on TOFC.

Meanwhile Have found an even better Credo. Will post about that too.

God bless,

In Christo pro Papa

Jane

Jane said...

Perhaps had better rename blog: 'Oases in English and French Catholicism' What do you thinks?!

God bless,

In Christo pro Papa

Prima said...

This article is quite good. There are several sentences that are priceless. Consider this one: "The Catholic Church’s present commitment to ecumenical dialogue with Protestantism has proved, at least as far as securing actual Christian unity is concerned, a policy failure. It has certainly produced deeply valuable forms of local cooperation ...." Well, if you've read Divided by Faith, that's where they stopped back in the 17th century, so we really haven't advanced beyond that. And the Lutheran-Catholic agreement on Justification was dead before it got out of the gate (cf. the Catholic Response, authored (probably) by Cardinal Ratzinger).

Anyway, I wish this article were in great supply across the USA, where the notion of ecumenism is very fuzzy and is regarded as more advanced than it really is.

Regards.